Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman

Associate Professor & Director of Graduate Studies

I am a zooarchaeologist and historical archaeologist with primary interests in the experiences of Native Americans and Europeans in the colonial period. I am interested in the consequences of European colonization of North America, specifically the introduction of Eurasian livestock into indigenous subsistence systems, the effect of livestock on North American landscapes, and the integration of indigenous labor into expanding European market economies.  I work both in the southeastern and southwestern regions of North America.  In both regions I am interested in the role of Native American labor and animal husbandry products in the emergence of global economies in the 18th century. 

 

Degrees
  • BA Binghamton University
  • PhD University of Georgia
Course Name Course Title Semester Syllabus
ANTH222 Introduction to Ecological and Evolutionary Anthropology Spring 2017 Syllabus
ANTH222 Introduction to Ecological and Evolutionary Anthropology Spring 2017 Syllabus
ANTH222 Introduction to Ecological and Evolutionary Anthropology Spring 2016 Syllabus
ANTH341 Introduction to Zooarchaeology Spring 2016 Syllabus

My research addresses Native American and European experiences in the early colonial period, particularly from the seventeenth to the early nineteenth centuries. I am interested in the consequences of European colonization of North America, specifically the introduction of Eurasian livestock into indigenous subsistence systems, the effect of livestock on North American landscapes, and the integration of indigenous labor into expanding European market economies. The technical approach that I take to this research is zooarchaeology, the study of non-human animal remains from archaeological contexts. I work both in the southeastern and southwestern regions of North America. In both regions I am interested in the role of Native American labor and animal husbandry products in the emergence of global economies in the 18th century.

Selected Publications

Pavao-Zuckerman, Barnet (2011) Rendering Economies: Native American Labor and Secondary Animal Products in the Eighteenth-Century Pimería Alta. American Antiquity 76(1):3-23.

Pavao-Zuckerman, Barnet, Rick Karl and John F. Chamblee (2011) FaunAZ: Arizona's Archaeofaunal Index. The SAA Archaeological Record 11(1):33-36.

Pavao-Zuckerman, Barnet (2010) Animal Husbandry at Pimería Alta Missions: El Ganado en el Sudoeste de Norteamérica. In Anthropological Approaches to Zooarchaeology: Colonialism, Complexity and Animal Transformations, edited by Douglas V. Campana, Pam J. Crabtree, Susan D. deFrance, Justin Lev-Tov and Alice M. Choyke, pp. 150-158. Oxbow Books, Oxford.

Reitz, Elizabeth J., Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman, Daniel C. Weinand, and wyneth A. Duncan (2010) Mission and Pueblo of Santa Catalina de Guale, St. Catherines Island, Georgia: A Comparative Zooarchaeological AnalysisAnthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History, No. 91, New York, NY. 

Pavao-Zuckerman, Barnet (2007) Deerskins and Domesticates: Creek Subsistence and Economic Strategies in the Historic Period. American Antiquity 72(1):5-33.

Pavao-Zuckerman, Barnet and Vincent M. LaMotta (2007) Missionization and Economic Change in the Pimería Alta: The Zooarchaeology of San Agustín de Tucson. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 11(3):241-268.

Pavao-Zuckerman, Barnet and Elizabeth J. Reitz (2006) Introduction and Adoption of Eurasian Livestock in North America. In Handbook of North American Indians, Vol. 3: Environment, Origins, and Population, edited by Douglas Ubelaker, pp. 485-491. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C.

Pavao-Zuckerman, Barnet 2000 Vertebrate Subsistence in the Mississippian-Historic Period Transition.Southeastern Archaeology 19(2):135-144.

Pavao, Barnet and Peter W. Stahl (1999) Structural Density Assays of Leporid Skeletal Elements with Implications for Taphonomic, Actualistic and Archaeological Research. Journal of Archaeological Science26(1):53-66.

Current Students
Related Students (Listed by Student on Student's Profile)
  • BP UMD
0106 Woods Hall
Department of Anthropology
Phone: (301) 405-0697
Email: bpavao@umd.edu